Coverin job?

Discussion in 'General Plane Discussion' started by zx32tt, Sep 1, 2014.

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  1. Sep 1, 2014 #1

    zx32tt

    zx32tt

    zx32tt

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    How much should I expect to pay for a good covering job (monokote) on a 40% Carden Cap 232, labor only? 3 colors. No painting involved.
    thanks,
    Chuck
     
  2. Sep 1, 2014 #2

    BRUTUS

    BRUTUS

    BRUTUS

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    Depends on the scheme, quality, and timeframe. I think $700 to 1200 is within reason. If it's a professional job that is.
     
  3. Sep 1, 2014 #3

    zx32tt

    zx32tt

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    That's about what I figured. So, here's the rest of the story....
    Some time ago, a "friend" crashed his beautiful Carden Cap 232. He snagged a power line on landing approach, and literally broke the plane in half at the rear of the canopy. I was able to put the fuse back together, since it was a clean break, and everything trammed out perfect. While doing the repair, the owner decided he wanted a new covering job, some extensive lightening to the motorbox , landing gear plate, rudder and elevators. Put on a new canopy, repair the major crunch to one wing, and remove and replace the robart hinges on the rudder. OK. No problem. The plane has been ready to go for over a year, and the owner has yet to come pick it up, despite several messages. I finally told him we needed to settle up on the plane and he should come and get it ASAP. When he asked how much, I told him $600 for everything. I had to buy 2 more rolls of monokote to finish the plane. He seemed shocked that I asked that much. When I asked him what he had expected to pay, he didn't have a answer. Now he is saying he might just sell the plane and cut his losses. I still have the airframe. What to do :willynilly:
     
  4. Sep 1, 2014 #4

    zx32tt

    zx32tt

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    here's the Cap 232.
     

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  5. Sep 1, 2014 #5

    BRUTUS

    BRUTUS

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    Didn't you do a thread about this some time ago? I think the consensus was that you should have talked price before starting the work, and the fact the client doesn't seem to appreciate other peoples time and labor. If he doesn't want it, I'd see what he's willing to pay, then if you cant't come to some discounted price I'd sell the airframe, good luck getting much out of it though.
     
  6. Sep 1, 2014 #6

    zx32tt

    zx32tt

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    Nope, must have been someone else.
     
  7. Sep 1, 2014 #7

    aussiesteve

    aussiesteve

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    I remember the thread Cody is talking about - It was on a different forum.
    Your story is typical of working on peoples hobbies. Few want to pay much for their hobby and even fewer value the work put in by others on hobby items. This is made even worse by the Chinese takeover of most things hobby related (especially RC) where a complete airframe can be purchased for less than what a repair should cost.

    If the person is a good friend - come to an agreement, cut your losses and move on. It's not worth destroying the friendship over a couple of hundred dollars.

    If the person isn't a close friend, offer to purchase the wreck from him at a fair price for a wrecked plane then sell it and move on. If he's left the plane at your place for a long time, chances are he has lost interest in it and isn't prepared to spend money on something he's no longer interested in.

    Just be wary about helping out in future and establish an agreed price in advance.

    Nowadays, When I help people out from the field, I let them do the work in my shop and charge them in beers for the use of my shop - I also tell them to buy their own glues, paint, covering etc and they keep the leftovers (I usually give them a list of things to buy). I only help out close friends in this way and it works out well - they get their planes fixed and learn the skills to not only use for themselves next time but also to pass on to others.

    Very few have ever made a decent income, even a decent supplementary one, building model planes or fixing them for people. If you think RC is bad - try making money out of Boat repairs - that's another game where people want the world for very little. ;)
     
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  8. Sep 2, 2014 #8

    Classclown

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    You tell the schmuck to go fish. You fixed it, you covered it, he doesn't want to pay your price, you sell it to me, screw him.

    But damn, I don't remember that plane having such a huge counter balancer on that rudder...
     
  9. Sep 4, 2014 #9

    JeffinTD

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    Slightly off topic, but it looks like you did some excellent work there.
     
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