BUSA 1/3 EDO float build

Discussion in 'Plane Kits & Frames' started by BRUTUS, Feb 11, 2013.

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  1. Feb 11, 2013 #1

    BRUTUS

    BRUTUS

    BRUTUS

    Plank Junky Lifetime Supporter

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    The first time I ever went to a 3D event was the 2007 Team Flying Circus Las Vegas Throwdown. I drove over 14 hours to get there with a rented U-haul enclosed trailer. I had my first 100cc plane in the back, and I hadn't even flown it yet. I was awestruck by the shear magnitude of talent that came out to fly. Showtime, Racer Bob, Flying Painter, Planebender, Rocky, Mithrandir, Joe Hunt, Rabbit Ron, and the list goes on and on. And while over the years many people have come and gone, One thing has stayed with me. The way I felt when I saw PlaneBenders 1/3 World Models Clipped Wing Cub. with BUSA 1/3 floats on it. I hadn't even seen the Lake Havasu video, and I was in love. The size of the floats combined with that tall sided, beautiful red and white Cub, with those big star-bursts on the wings and fuse made me feel like a kid again. I never knew anyone made Cub's that big, and since I had over 40 hours in the full scale versions the romance of floats combined with my own feelings of nostalgia set me down a path to one day own something like what I saw in PlaneBenders trailer.

    Here we are, 6 years later and I am finally beginning to realize my own dream of having a big-ass Cub on floats!

    PlaneBender, and his now infamous Clipped Wing 100cc Cub:

    [ame]http://youtu.be/n6giOTJgfmg[/ame]
     

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    Last edited: Feb 12, 2013
  2. Feb 11, 2013 #2

    BRUTUS

    BRUTUS

    BRUTUS

    Plank Junky Lifetime Supporter

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    To begin with, I ordered these float kits directly from BUSA about a month before I actually got them. There was an issue with my card, and it took some time to get it straightened out. I still recommend to BUSA that they step up their customer contact. I orderd a foamy from Nitroplanes and got e-mail notification as each step in shipping was confirmed. The only confirmation I got from BUSA was a box full of wood a month late, which is where we start.

    Box O wood! Lots of hardware and about 15#'s of assorted materials. The kit looks to be very complete with high quality plans, directions, and hardware. It has been a LONG time since I dived into a kit like this- on the magnitude of about 23 years in fact! The die-crunched parts took on the order of about three hours before they were separated from the sheets with a #11 Exacto blade and a cutting board. After that I separated the parts into two sides, and began numbering formers. After about another hour I had all the formers individually numberes, ordered, and stacked in their own one gallon zip lock bags.

    Next step is to make myself a building board out of 2" thick blue or pink foam, where I will affix the plans and begin assembly!
     

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  3. Feb 11, 2013 #3

    thepamster

    thepamster

    thepamster

    The Mistress of Biplanes Lifetime Supporter

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    WOW! WHAT A BUNCH OF WOOD.! That looks like some big 1/4 scale kit with all that wood and hardware. Daaaaaaamm!
    Is it done yet? :biggrin:
     
  4. Feb 11, 2013 #4

    Tseres

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    Tseres

    Whiny Old Man

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    That looks great. Kind of reminds me of the Dumas boat kit that I built when I was a kid.

    Looking forward to this build. I've never seen floats built before.
     
  5. Feb 12, 2013 #5

    BRUTUS

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    BRUTUS

    Plank Junky Lifetime Supporter

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    Me neither:thumbsup:

    I'm sorely tempted to bust out my hole saws and remove about 30% of the wood from those formers. I could keep them as solid bulkheads to keep the plane from sinking if I hit a rock or something, but I really want to save as much weight, and retain as much flight performance as possible. I'm heading to the store for my building board as we speak.:biggrin:
     
  6. Feb 12, 2013 #6

    Tseres

    Tseres

    Tseres

    Whiny Old Man

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    I use a core less sliding door with 1/2 in drywall on top of it.
     
  7. Feb 12, 2013 #7

    Bunky f. knuckle

    Bunky f. knuckle

    Bunky f. knuckle

    Cover shot, MA 10/09!!!

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    I used a hollow core door too. I then bought a sheet of 3/4" ply, and mounted it to my table frame, and laid a sheet of 3/16" tempered glass on top. Surrounded the glass on the edges by a piece of 1/4x1" strip wood.

    I probably have around $350 in my table.
     
  8. Feb 12, 2013 #8

    aussiesteve

    aussiesteve

    aussiesteve

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    Bunky
    What do you use instead of pins / magnets to hold bits when building?
    I am about to do an upgrade for the top of my table (currently covered in cork that is pretty much worn out and too small for the current table) and am considering various options.

    Brut - sorry about the little hijack of the thread
     
  9. Feb 12, 2013 #9

    BRUTUS

    BRUTUS

    BRUTUS

    Plank Junky Lifetime Supporter

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    No worries- nice to see you guys in here.

    Didn't get much done tonight, but I have my building board-2" thick pink foam. It's nice flat, and moveable. I did come to a startling realization- I cannot move the airplane through my house with the floats on. Impossible. My garage space is seriously limited right now, and that plane would take up every inch of free space I have out there. I dread the thought of fitting the floats at the lake every time I wanted to fly it on water. All those tiny nuts and bolts.... in the rough... It hurts my head just thinking about it!

    All that aside, the first step is making the spar out of 4 pieces of 1/4" thick by 3/4" strips, spliced, and laminated. So, I separated the sticks into left and right. Then I familiarized myself with the directions, and I'm calling it a night.

    Oh, and I still need to get some wax paper.
     

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  10. Feb 12, 2013 #10

    Tseres

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    Tseres

    Whiny Old Man

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    Looks to me like you could detach the floats with 4 screws at the fuse. Can you leave the floats assembled and still move it around your house?
     
  11. Feb 12, 2013 #11

    BRUTUS

    BRUTUS

    BRUTUS

    Plank Junky Lifetime Supporter

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    There are only 4 hard mounts- but there are at least four more "flying wires" that need to be fitted as well. Some full scales have 8.
     

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  12. Feb 13, 2013 #12

    BRUTUS

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    BRUTUS

    Plank Junky Lifetime Supporter

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    I managed a few more hours tonight, and it's official- I have completed steps 1, and 2. Which is splicing together the backbone of the floats, making the openings for the spreaders to go through, and then gluing the top and bottom pieces together against a large straightedge. I used a sliding T bevel as a guide for my Marples Japanese Pull saw (a centuries old design, and the best precision cutting tool that doesn't run on electricity), a rat-tail file, and a sanding block to make the splices and mill the holes. Then I used the factory edge of some MDF I had in the shop as a straightedge to keep the backbone straight during the gluing process.

    On another note- I did an experiment today. Instead of Wax paper, which always seems to stick to whatever I'm gluing, I decided to try a thin sheet of painters plastic instead. It worked perfectly- the glue never stuck to it at all. Parts came loose with ease, and if there was any excess it stayed localized and didn't spread too much. Any excess glue was easily sanded off with a block.

    The instructions say- if you want to cut lightening holes in the formers, now is the time, so that will be tomorrows project.
     

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    Last edited: Feb 13, 2013
  13. Feb 13, 2013 #13

    TManiaci

    TManiaci

    TManiaci

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    Nice work Cody. Keep it going.... is it done yet?
     
  14. Feb 14, 2013 #14

    BRUTUS

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    Plank Junky Lifetime Supporter

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    Thanks T, I was waiting for that!

    Finished steps 3 and 4.

    In the spirit of 3D, I would really like to be able to torque roll my Super Cub with floats on. So, I took 2 hours on the drill press with an assortment of hole-saws and drilled lightening holes in all 28 formers. In all I removed about 1/4 the total weight. Formers for both floats weighed in at exactly 8oz's before lightening. I removed a whopping 2oz's. I tried to keep the structural parts- specifically the wood between the backbone and the forward spruce keel mostly intact. I would hate to hit a submerged object and crush the front of the float! I stacked everything on the first backbone to demonstrate what a 3D float should look like.

    I must admit- even though I am a trim carpenter by trade, and have built all kinds of kits when I was younger, I am a little reticent to start gluing things together. Partly because space in my house is at a premium, partly because I don't have the tiny weighted squares and clamps that I would like to have before starting a project of this magnitude, and finally I don't want to screw anything up!

    In the last picture you will be able to see why the next two days are perfect for building! When I woke up it was sunny, blue skies, and no wind. Within an hour it was blowing snow!
     

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    Last edited: Feb 14, 2013
  15. Feb 15, 2013 #15

    BRUTUS

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    Plank Junky Lifetime Supporter

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    Made a trip to Harbor freight and spent $20 on some magnets. I don't have a magnetic building board. But these magnets are powerful, and heavy enough to hold my backbone, and formers square and plumb while i glue them up. I managed to get one float glued up, and managed to get the front and rear keel's glued in. Next is the Chine strips. Yeah- I didn't know either. It's the outer stringers. I will have to get to that tomorrow- my Valentine has something special planned for me tonight:devil::ihih::arf:
     

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  16. Feb 15, 2013 #16

    david010567

    david010567

    david010567

    aka Schlawiener

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    Looks awesome Brutimus Maximus... You'll be doing the rivets before you know it.
     
  17. Feb 15, 2013 #17

    aussiesteve

    aussiesteve

    aussiesteve

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    Please - no photos of him doing the Golden Rivet :ack:
     
  18. Feb 15, 2013 #18

    Tseres

    Tseres

    Tseres

    Whiny Old Man

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    Like the magnet idea. Never thought about using them.
     
  19. Feb 15, 2013 #19

    BRUTUS

    BRUTUS

    BRUTUS

    Plank Junky Lifetime Supporter

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    The black ceramic magnets are actually almost too powerful- you have to be careful not to crunch anything getting them on and off. The red ones have a little less tug, and have perfect holding power when spread apart by the 1/8" balsa formers. The black ones still pinch the backbone pretty good even though it is 1/4" thick.
     
  20. Feb 15, 2013 #20

    BRUTUS

    BRUTUS

    BRUTUS

    Plank Junky Lifetime Supporter

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    OK, next step is the Chine strips- I used my right angle to make certain the backbone and keel are square. Sticks cut from left over material, T-pins, and small clamps kept everything stright. Then I used my mark one eyeball tool to eliminate any bumps or unevenness in the chines using my sanding block to adjust the notches in the formers.

    Gluing them in was pretty straight forward once I got everything lined up.

    One down, one to go.

    You can see I already found a use for my 1/8" thick 4' long $5.00 aluminum ruler I picked up. Good thing I bought this- the plans have a 1/4" warp in them. I use my eyeball to straighten the last one- this one was much easier to get arrow-straight!
     

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